Amy Acker starred as Beatrice in Joss Whedon’s 2012 film version of Much Ado About Nothing, and she discusses her initial trepidation over playing this great role onscreen; how her early training at SMU and experience at American Players Theatre in Wisconsin prepared her for it; how casual play readings lead to leading roles; the value of rehearsing; the fun of doing your own stunts; the joy of working with the Joss Whedon Dancers; the differences between preparing for a play and preparing for a movie; how the Whedonverse is more Shakespearean than the (David E.) Kelleyverse; and the counterintuitive marvel (no pun intended) of how making a movie is more relaxing than taking an actual vacation. (Length 22:10)

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Comments
  1. Speaking of Vancouver character actors, Human IMDb, I worked with Malcolm “Virgon Delegate on the Quorum of Twelve” Stewart back in my summer stock days.

  2. I love playing “Who Was That?” As an avid sci-fi fan, I often find myself playing a variation called “Spot the Vancouver Character Actor”, and I make a conscious effort to learn the names of favorite itinerant thespians. It’s gotten to the point that my friends sort of think of me as a human IMDB and will ask me about actors in things we watch before resorting to the internet. :-]

    (By the way, I recognize Mr. Morrison primarily from a short-lived show called Point Pleasant. He was really good.)

  3. Austin,
    Thanks so much for the “Just Showing Up” podcast, I can’t wait to see Mr. Morrison’s film. Especially home-hitting was the concept of thinking of the audition as the gig itself, allowing you to leave it behind and move onto the next project.

    Audition Story:
    I was doing a show with the wonderfully talented Michael Faulkner at A Noise Within in Glendale. Having been a huge RSC fan for years and years and years, I felt it was my duty to badger Michael incessantly about any possibility of upcoming auditions. I couldn’t believe my luck when Michael told me that RSC”s required Equity auditions were happening soon.

    I badgered, Michael gave me the info., I showed up – 80% in the bag!

    The remaining 20% of the audition was possibly the funnest “gig” I’ve ever done. I told a bad joke, did a monologue, played my banjo, and got to chat with two of my idols.

    You came to see Michael in the show a week or two later, recognized me in the lobby, and even remembered my name!

    Thanks so much for that, and here’s hoping for an opportunity to “show up” again.

    Kurt

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