Gary Andrews is an animator and single dad whose #DoodleaDay visual diary chronicles his life, particularly how it transformed several years ago with the sudden death of his wife Joy (left). Gary discusses the rules he gives himself and how his daily ritual became a major part of the grieving process and a meaningful balm to an increasing number of followers and fans. Featuring touching chords, the marvel of having both talent and bandwidth, a beautiful film made from his drawings, the power of unpacking the day, the hardest thing one ever has to do, the mystery of laughter continuing through grief, how you can donate to the UK Sepsis Trust, Shakespeare being a constant, shout-outs to Fireman Sam and Horrid Henry, and connections to RSC founding member Adam Long! (Length 18:14)

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  1. Bonnie W. Carlson

    I agree! I completely buy the implausibility. It is absolutely implausible. Very easy to buy that. Well said. And love the Happy Days allusion. Jumping the shark should hereby be the phrase to sum up the utter self-destruction of any artistic endeavor. B is an appropriate grade as this film should be seen with a buzz. I too loved Christopher Guest as Anne Boleyn. And the epiphany that Tom Hulce wrote Shakespeare’s plays? Priceless! I laughed, I cried, it was the feel-good review of the year!

  2. I too could not really wait to see the movie, so I saw it the Saturday that it opened. I agree that the costuming was outstanding; I rather liked the acting. But the STORY – Yikes! Any relation between history and this really was coincidental! I mean, the Essex rebellion did do a Shakespeare play beforehand, but it was Richard II, and Robert Cecil had a bad leg, he wasn’t a hunchback. The whole plot, I think, set back the cause of the DeVere afficionados back about 200 years. Not that I mind. I think the whole DeVere theory is elitist. Thanks for your review. It was good to be able to listen you all your opinions!

  3. I was surprised by how much I enjoyed this and how Emmerich kept the story moving well enough to keep me glued, even if it does feel a tad over-dramatic to an extent. Good review. Check out mine when you get the chance.

  4. William Shakespeare did NOT write the plays. Rather, they were written by another author of the same name.

  5. A very well-balanced review, guys. Personally I can’t wait to see the movie, because it will be an opportunity for me to take many Xanax beforehand. Your listeners may be interested in this former Reducer’s dissection of the whole authorship controversy a couple of years ago.

    http://infinitejess.blogspot.com/2007/10/shakespeare-authorship.html

    FYI, Howard’s concern about the order of scenes in Hamlet: Emmerich seems to have used the order from the First Quarto of 1603… to his credit.

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